The Best Rangefinders For Golf

How to Pick a Golf Rangefinder

If you’re a dedicated golf player and want to up your game, you’ve probably considered getting a laser golf rangefinder to help you adjust the force behind your strokes to the distance between you and the hole. The problem: there are tons of rangefinders, so how are you supposed to pick the best golf rangefinder for you? That’s where we come in. Our research team took on the green conducting 20 golf rangefinder reviews. The result is the list of great golf laser rangefinders below. We’ve narrowed the choices down to the top ten best rangefinder models to fit different needs and budgets. Before we start, take a look at what features and specs to watch for when buying.

TecTecTec VPRO500 Golf Rangefinder

The VPRO500 is definitely not new, but it’s more than earned its honored reputation as it’s the best selling golf rangefinder you’ll find for 2017! The masses have spoken and our experts concur!

Although this particular model doesn’t sport the slope measuring feature, it excels in every aspect it does have. Take for example its multi-lens diopter adjustment that cuts out the blur and fuzz of measuring long distances. It provides for an even clearer and brighter view regardless if you’re near or far-sighted!

Being able to measure out past 500 yards, the advanced Pinsensor can lock onto targets to within +/- 1 yard to give you the unwavering confidence of accuracy whether you’re pointing at the hole, trees, or hazards!

As a time-honored model for Tec Tec, it’s proven to be worth the small investment as it performs far beyond its price range. If you did want a waterproof unit with 60 yards more measuring distance, the new TecTecTec VPRODLX Golf Rangefinder might peak your interests.

But, there’s a classic feel about the small and compact VPRO500 even though it sports some ultra-new technology. Better yet, it’s tournament legal, comes with a 2-year warranty, and a few extra freebies to make it convenient and extremely portable to use.

Trust the golfing pros when they say the Tec laser rangefinder is exactly what you need for today’s highly competitive sport. This baby is the most popular golf rangefinder this year for a reason!

Leupold GX-5i3 Digital Golf Rangefinder

Leupold to come out with a brand spanking new golf yardage scope that’s been beefed up with steroids to look like something out of a sci-fi flick!

If you’re wearing gloves, you can tell by the rugged texture of the unit that it’s going to be grippy and stable to use without chance of slipping even! Forget about using a prop with this scope. It’s incredibly stable as it ranges out to increased accuracy to the nearest 1/10 of a yard!

The True Golf Range and Club Selector functions ban it from tournament use. Unlike past models where you were forced to leave the unit behind in the car, this 2017 model has the option to disable these awesome features to make it a legal unit during play. Now, that’s a win-win kinda situation!

It’s not like Leupold to only dish out one new entree at a time. They’ve also released two other new golf rangefinders that are making a name for themselves as some of the best selling units of 2017! The Leupold GX-1i3 and the Leupold GX-2i3 are both new have been upgraded with Leupold’s latest technology.

For a simpler unit, the GX-1i3 is fully waterproof with DNA, Fog Mode, and PinHunter laser technology. The GX-2i3 goes a step further and includes a Club Selector function. But, the GX-5i3 eats up both sports and units it all! That’s why it has a heftier price tag to accommodate for its gluttonous nature. It’s a good feeling to feel sated, isn’t it?

Bushnell Tour V4 Rangefinder

Right on the heels of Leupold, Bushnell comes out with their new and improved version of their Tour series rangefinders and cleans up their inventory. The Tour V4 is your ultimate, tournament-worthy laser rangefinder that can range out to a mouth-gaping 1000 yards!

Don’t be fooled into thinking it won’t be accurate that far out. With PinSeeker Technology under its belt, you’ll be accurate to within -/+ 1 yard! You won’t have to wonder if your unit is on target either since this affordable golf scope is clad with Jolt Technology to literally vibrate when it’s locked onto its target!

If you’re hanging out to the hole, the unit will lock into 400 yards, plus some! It has 5X magnification with fast focus lens to allow you to see the green clearer than ever and with more stability than before.

Speaking of stability, the unit sports an ergonomic design with Stabi-Grip Technology and multi-coated lens to ensure your shaking hands won’t interfere with your view.

The V4 still has you covered if you can’t help but feel the void of no slope compensation. The best-selling Tour V4 Slope model has the angle compensating mode to get you distance despite the inclines or drops that can affect your stroke.

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The History of Golf

Golf is one sport that has lasted for many, many years. From players during the reign of Caesar in golf’s earliest stages to players like Phil Mickelson and Rory McIlroy of today. Golf has endured the test of time and has come through as an important sport in each part of the globe.

Golf dates back to the time of Julius Caesar. Although it was not the golf that is played today, it was a similar game. They played by striking a feather-stuffed ball with club-shaped tree branches. Golf was also traced back to the Song Dynasty in China during the years 960 to 1279. The games of these times were not exactly the golf that is known today; the roots of today’s game can be traced back to Scotland in 1457. The game was then outlawed by King James II of Scotland, as it detracted from the training for the military.

Golf became a pastime in Great Britain in the seventeenth century, and that was a familiar theme throughout the world. In 1860, the first British Open, a tournament that is still played today, had taken place. The popularity of the sport then began to spread throughout the entire world. The first permanent golf club in North America was founded in Montreal, Canada, in 1873 and was named “Canada’s Royal Montreal Club.” The US caught wind of this and decided to embrace the golf craze as well. The first 18-hole course in the United States was in The Chicago Golf Club in Wheaton, Illinois, in 1893.

The governing body of golf began as the United States Golf Association (USGA) in the year 1894. Then the current governing body of today, the Professional Golf Association of America, was founded in 1916. Both amateurs and professionals are allowed to play in open events like the US Open and the British Open, which are “open” to the public. However, there are certain events that amateurs are not allowed to play in, like the world golf championships– the Accenture Match Play Championship or the Arnold Palmer Invitational. These events are examples of professional events only.

Beginning in 1981, the name of the pro circuit was officially changed to the Tournament Players Association (TPA) Tour. The name was changed again to its current name of the Professional Golfers Association or the PGA tour. Tournament golf had become a well-established spectator sport in the United States by the 1920s and has been gaining popularity ever since. Golf is known around the globe and has gained popularity, as it is becoming more televised and marketed. Golf seems to be a sport that will go on to live forever.

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How To Get a Better Golf Swing

1. Keep Your Hands Low

Limiting the height of the followthrough will effectively reduce the height of your shots. The lower the hands, the lower the ball flight. Moving the ball back in your stance or choosing a stronger club and trying to swing easy are other ways to accomplish the same thing, but they’re less reliable and more difficult to execute. Instead, keep your hands low in the finish (compare the two photos at right), and the trajectory of your shots will be lower.

2. Give Your Spine The Forearm

Make sure you’re on-plane at the top of the swing to guarantee solid ball-striking and increased accuracy. Notice in the photo at left how my right forearm is parallel to my spine, my left wrist is flat and my elbows and arms form a tight triangle. These are indications that I’ve rotated my shoulders into the backswing perfectly.

3. Use Your Body For Power

Every good golfer knows that power comes from the body, not the arms. To learn to power the club with your body instead of your arms and hands, put the club behind the ball at address, with your body in a dead-stop position. Without taking a backswing, try to drag the ball into the air. {If you’re a player who uses his or her hands to control the club, you’ll probably struggle at first.|If you’re a player who uses his or her hands to control the club, you’ll probably struggle at.} {However, you’ll quickly find that once you start moving the club with your body, you’ll begin to get the ball in the air more consistently.|You’ll quickly find that once you start moving the club with your body, you’ll begin to get the ball in the air more consistently.} This helps you turn fully through the ball on the downswing.

Brady Riggs, PGA, is a Golf Tips Senior Instruction Editor and one of the most sought-after instructors in Southern California. Photography by Warren Keating.

4. Hinge For Power

Amateurs have problems hitting crisp iron shots due to two fatal flaws. {First, the takeaway tends to be too low to the ground, which delays the proper hinging of the wrists until too late in the backswing.|The takeaway tends to be too low to the ground, which delays the proper hinging of the wrists until too late in the backswing.} Second, in a misguided effort to create power, the arms tend to swing too far in the backswing. This causes a breakdown in posture and usually leads to a reverse pivot. These flaws cause mis-hits and a lack of distance and control.

Several simple steps can be taken to gain control over the length of the swing in order to create more solid contact. At setup, a 45-degree angle should be present between the left arm and the club shaft. This starts the swing with the wrists already hinged halfway to the necessary 90 degrees. During the takeaway, the hands should stay close to the ground while the clubhead moves up quickly. The goal is to get the left thumb pointing at the right shoulder as soon as possible. You’ll know you’ve achieved the proper wrist hinge when your left arm is parallel to the ground and the club shaft is perpendicular to it. This sets the wrists much earlier in the backswing, eliminating the need to swing the arms too far at the top. The tendency to lose posture and reverse pivot will be removed with this more compact golf swing.

Creating the proper wrist hinge in the backswing will lead to noticeably better ball-striking and, as a result, more consistent distance and direction on all iron shots.

— Brady Riggs

5. Give Your Slice The Elbow

Some players like John Daly swing with their elbow flying out, while others like Sergio Garcia keep it in, proving that it’s possible to hit great shots with either method. {However, my biomechanical studies indicate that the flying right elbow position favors a fade ball flight while a tucked right elbow promotes a draw.|My biomechanical studies indicate that the flying right elbow position favors a fade ball flight while a tucked right elbow promotes a draw.} If you struggle with slicing or have always wanted to develop a power-rich draw, then the right elbow may hold the answer. Plus, when you let the right elbow fly, it has the tendency to raise the right shoulder skyward, which almost always causes an over-the-top move during the downswing and an array of bad results.

The key to long-term success is to eliminate the faulty shoulder tilt and right elbow position at the top. The most efficient right elbow position for keeping slices at bay and promoting a draw is on or just inside the seam running down the right side of your shirt. When you place your right elbow in this general area, it allows the shoulders to turn level to the spine, making it much easier to drop the club inside on the downswing for maximum power and improved control.

Tom Stickney is the director of instruction at the Club at Cordillera in Vail, Colo. (www.tomstickneygolf.com). Here’s another great tip from Tom.

6. Solid Plane = No Slice

An open face at the point of contact can cause a slice. {So, too, can a faulty swing path, even if your clubface is square to the target at impact.|Too, can a faulty swing path, even if your clubface is square to the target at impact.} Slicers’ swing paths tend to come too much outside in (hookers, vice versa). All golfers need a path that comes just slightly from the inside. Try the Box Drill. Take the top half of a golf ball box and stand it on its side. Align the box parallel to your target line as shown. Strive to groove a path that allows the shaft to pass just over the box. For slicers, set up the box on the same line, but just forward of the golf ball. Don’t hit the box!

7. Thumbs Up, Thumbs Down

Hookers need to stop the clubface from closing too soon. To do this, adopt a thumbs-down approach to impact. In the photos at right, you clearly can see the red side of the paddle with both my thumbs pointing down toward the ground. {This type of movement slows the closing of your clubface, thus eliminating shots that curve to the left.|This type of movement slows the closing of your clubface, thus eliminating shots that curve to them.} In the second photo, the blue side of the paddle shows. This thumbs-up position is what slicers need to attain (a closing of the clubface).

PGA professional Chuck Winstead is the director of instruction at the University Club in Baton Rouge, La., and also is the coach of the LSU golf team. Check out his lesson on Easier Driving.

8. No Flips

golf swing tips” Flippiness” (the dreaded early release) occurs if your body gets too far in front of the golf ball. When this happens, your club will drastically lag, usually with an open face. Instinctually, your hands will work to close the face at impact. This level of timing is difficult even for the pros to execute on a consistent basis. What usually happens is the clubhead races in front of the shaft and strikes the ball with an open or a closed face, and typically on an ascending arc. In baseball, if you get too far in front, you’ll hit the ball to right field, unless you flip the wrists. The same is true in golf. You need to establish a firm left a side to keep your head behind the ball and stop the flip. Photography by Warren Keating

Usual suspects Enemy number one: Your body is out of position or out of balance. Your body senses this, so your hands take over to try to get the clubface squared at impact. {However, this adjustment usually takes the form of a flick or flip of the wrists.|This adjustment usually takes the form of a flick or flip of the wrists.}

Fixing The Flip Set up to an impact bag (or an old duffel bag stuffed with towels), push the clubhead into the bag and set your body into a good impact position. The lead arm and shaft should form one straight, vertical line with the head back. Make sure your lead leg is braced and that your hips are turned slightly open. Hold this position to create the proper feel.

Glenn Deck is the Director of Instruction at Pelican Hill G.C. in Newport Beach, California

 

9. Chippinggolf swing tips

{Although it’s tempting to hit chips indoors, all it takes is one broken lamp to realize that golf is an outdoor activity.|It’s tempting to hit chips indoors, all it takes is one broken lamp to realize that golf is an outdoor activity.} {Nevertheless, you can improve your chipping technique within the friendly confines of your own living room with the help of a wooden dowel or broken golf shaft.Take the dowel and place it through the hole on the top of the grip on a pitching wedge.|You can improve your chipping technique within the friendly confines of your own living room with the help of a wooden dowel or broken golf shaft.Take the dowel and place it through the hole on the top of the grip on a pitching wedge.} Push the dowel roughly eight to 12 inches down the butt end of the shaft (a little Vaseline may help the dowel slide easier through the clubshaft). Two to three feet of the dowel should extend outward from the top of the grip.

golf swing tips Now, practice your chipping motion, making sure that your left wrist remains rigid as the clubface passes through the impact zone. If your left wrist breaks down (a flaw that can cause a lot of short-game misery), you’ll feel the protruding portion of the dowel hit against your left side. In addition to guarding against wrist breakdown, the dowel will also help you to establish the proper hands-forward position at address– a crucial factor for clean contact.

The dowel also will force you to keep your hands moving forward and swing the club down the target line in the follow through. Once you master this drill, you’ll be able to get up and down with the best of them.

As you perform these drills, you’ll begin to see the value of other everyday items in helping you improve your game. Don’t be afraid to experiment– you may just develop the next must-have training aid.

Special thanks to instruction model, PGA professional Rick Avina. Avina instructs at Punta Mita Golf Club in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Photography by Warren Keating

10. Stay In Your Kgolf swing tips

Even good golfers with sound, grooved swings come untracked now and then, especially if they lose the flex in the back leg trying for distance. If you stiffen your back leg during the backswing, your body will likely tilt out of balance, making it tough to re-flex the knee just the right amount in time for impact. If you can play some great golf, but consistency is your problem, it might be that you need a dose of Special K. Here’s how it works.

K Pasa?

At address, the Special K is the angle formed in your back leg by the upper and lower leg. The manner in which you stand to the ball determines in large part how well you maintain your Special K during your swing.

The best advice is to establish an athletic, ready-to-move setup. Create this posture by bending forward from the hip sockets and back from the knees. When your back leg is flexed correctly, it creates room for your arms to swing and aligns the joints, one on top of the other. You should be able to draw a line from the top of the spine through the tip of the elbow and then from the tip of your knee down through the ball joint of your foot.

Keeping The K.

To keep your swing level, this angle should be maintained from address to just after impact. A good way to experience what it feels like to keep the Special K while you swing is to look in a mirror while you take practice swings. Start with the setup position shown in the photo, below left. Hold it steady, then look in the mirror to connect the sight and feel of the correct back leg flex for that position. Next, swing to the top. Again, hold that position and use the mirror to see if you maintained the angle in your back leg.

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